Herb Garden Trio

Herb Care

Day 1 Starting a Routine
  • Check soil every 3-4 days and water if it’s dry.
  • Ensure 6+ hours per day of light.
  • Keep track with this timeline to make sure your herbs grow.

Add care reminders to your calendar. Your herbs will thank you.

Day 3-7 Germination

Basil is typically the fastest of the herbs to sprout. Expect to see growth within the first week.

Not yet sprouted? Your seedlings may need more light if they haven’t sprouted by the end of the week on.The more light you have, the more water you’ll need and vice versa.

Week 2 Thinning

Basil is typically the fastest of the herbs to sprout. Expect to see growth within the first week.

Not yet sprouted? Your seedlings may need more light if they haven’t sprouted by the end of the week on.

The more light you have, the more water you’ll need and vice versa.

Month 2-6 Harvesting

As your basil continues to grow, keep harvesting to encourage growth!

If you only want a couple of leaves, pick leaves with where new ones are emerging at the base. for a bigger harvest, cut one of the stems directly harvest, cut of the stems directly.

When exactly? Once it has three separate sets of leaves, start trimming off the uppermost leaves.

 

How much? You shouldn’t harvest more than 1⁄3 of the plant at a time.

Month 6+ End of Life

Once your basil plant is mature, it’ll decide that it’s time to make seeds & die off. Delay this by clipping flower stalks as soon as you see them. It’s best to catch them as early as possible.

Has your basil run its natural course? You can compost the entire container.

Day 1 Starting a Routine
  • Check soil every 3-4 days and water if it’s dry.
  • Ensure 6+ hours per day of light.
  • Keep track with this timeline to make sure your herbs grow.

Add care reminders to your calendar. Your herbs will thank you.

Week 2 Germination

Cilantro can take up to 4 weeks to sprout, but typically will start to sprout in the second week if seeds were pre soaked.

Week 4 Early Growth

Unlike basil and parsley, cilantro does not require removing the weaker sprouts.

Can I eat it yet? For optimal growth (and taste), it’s best to wait until Month 2.

Month 2-5 Harvesting

As soon as plants are about 4 inches you can start harvesting. Pick the largest leaves and cut them about 1 inch from the base. Pick from the outside when taking an entire leaf.

Only Need a Little? Find a place where new growth is branching off and harvest about a half inch above the new growth.

Month 5-6 End of Life

As cilantro matures, the leaves will change to a feathery shape, reminiscent of dill.

Get creative! The mature leaves are much more bitter than the younger leaves, but you can use the seeds as coriander in your cooking.

Day 1 Starting a Routine
  • Check soil every 3-4 days and water if it’s dry.
  • Ensure 6+ hours per day of light.
  • Keep track with this timeline to make sure your herbs grow.

Add care reminders to your calendar. Your herbs will thank you.

Day 7-21 Germination

Parsley seeds can take up to 4 weeks to sprout. If you presoaked them you could see sprouts as soon as one week.

Week 4 Thinning

Carefully trim all but the largest sprout. There are only enough nutrients and space in the pot to support one healthy parsley plant.

Can I eat it yet? All your clippings are edible so enjoy a taste!

Month 2-6 Harvesting

Depending on your growth rate, you can begin to harvest sometime in Month 2.

How do I know when is best? Wait until the bottom leaves have at least 3 segments to harvest.

What’s the best way? Always harvest the outer leaves, leaving the inner ones to mature.

Month 6+ End of Life

Parsley is a biennial plant which means it naturally sets seed when it experiences hot summer temperatures.

Lengthen your parsley’s life! Make sure your plants don’t get too hot as this will trigger their end sooner.